Should Kids get Paid to Do Chores? Pros and Cons.

Should kids get paid to do chores? Let’s discuss the pros and cons so that you can make an informed decision.

If you google the phrase ‘should kids get paid to do chores?’, you’ll come across all kinds of articles debating both sides of the story. Not to mention a long list of chores for kids by age.

And in the comments section of each of those articles? Are usually a couple of mud-slinging parents touting the benefits of the side of the debate they find most aligns with their values and/or experience.

It’s hard to sift through all the opinions + judgment-calls to figure out what’s best for YOUR child.

But in the end, you’ve got to make a decision about this, right?

Hi, I’m Amanda L. Grossman from MoneyProdigy.com where I partner with mama Bears like YOU to teach your kids how to manage their money.

And today I’m going to break down for you the pros and cons of should kids get paid to do chores.

Let’s get some clarity!

Paying for Chores Con #1: It Doesn’t Help Internalize Motivation for Your Child to do Chores

The most successful adults are kids who internalized all those life lessons they were taught or experienced as kids. And completing chores is no different – you want your child to internalize and make a habit out of doing routine chores in their lives.

When you reward a child (or anyone) with money or stickers, or something else, it’s an external form of motivation.

You want kids to become adults who do the right thing without any sort of external motivation. Just because it feels ‘right’ for them to do so.

Jane Nelsen, author of Positive Discipline Parenting Tools, writes:

“Think about the long-term results of your approach. Does it encourage internal or external motivation? Internal motivation is important for the long term. Are you promoting self-evaluation or dependence on the evaluation of others? Are you inviting your child to think or telling them what to think? Are you allowing your child to figure things out for herself and engaging her in problem solving, or are you rescuing her and fixing things for her? Are you considering what your child might be thinking, feeling, and deciding in response to what you do or say, or do you avoid getting into your child’s world? Are you helping your child feel capable or dependent?”

Paying for Chores Con #2: Your Child Might Value their Time Over Money

What if one day, your child is no longer motivated by money? In other words, they just decide to not do the chores because they don’t care about the reward system you’ve set up for them?

You might be in trouble.

And this actually happens – I didn’t think it really would, but I’ve heard not only from mothers who talk about this, but also from random internet commenters in articles who complain that they have no idea how to move forward now to get their kid to do any work around the house.

If you set up a chore system where some sort of external reward is given, then you have to be prepared for if/when your child decides that that reward is no longer something they value themselves.

Paying for Chores Con #3: Your Kid Might Start Expecting to Be Rewarded for Everything

One family psychologist writes,

“I frequently hear complaints from parents about sticker charts gone awry. One mother who was initially pleased with the results of her sticker-chart system said that when she asked her 8-year-old son to stop what he was doing and help his younger brother clean up a spill, he responded: “What will you give me?”

It's a common issue, actually. If kids get rewarded for certain behavior, then they no longer want to give away good behavior for free because they think a reward might come for it. They hold out on you!

Paying for Chores Con #4: Your Child’s Lack of Chore Commitment Might Mean they Don’t Learn to Manage Money

With paying for chores, it’s easy to institute a quick punishment. Meaning, if your kid doesn’t do the chore, or does it so poorly that you’re constantly redoing it, then you just don’t pay them.

If paying your child money for their chore work is your sole means for getting money into your child’s hands on a consistent basis…then you might send them into the adult world without them knowing how to manage money simply because you withhold the money when they mess up (which happens, for sure).

That is not the goal, but something I hear from mothers pretty often – “We used to give them an allowance or pay for chores, but they never did the chores like they were supposed to do and I was always having to redo it. So, we never pay them.”

Paying for Chores Pro #1: Nagging May be a Thing of the Past

Money can be a great motivator for any number of things, and may produce immediate results. If you’re super frustrated with your current system for trying to get chores done in the house, then this might be a fast-pass ticket to some relief.

You can also institute a no-nagging policy when you pay for chores, meaning if they do the chore but you had to nag them to get it done, then they don’t get paid (though please see Con #4 from above).

Paying for Chores Pro #2: You Have an Easy Punishment System of No Play, No Pay

You have an immediate recourse for them not completing chores that you want them to. You can just not pay them.

Of course, this also may backfire – as we discussed in the “Cons” section, your child might be perfectly happy with not earning money this week or two weeks from now. This could leave you with a dirty bathroom counter and the problem of coming up with another punishment.

Tip: Remember that the reason you want to get money into your child’s hands is so that they can learn how to manage it – so I caution this approach, because if you never actually get money into your child’s hands due to them not living up to your expectations, then they’ll never learn how to manage it.

Paying for Chores Pro #3: It Helps them Associate Earning Money with Time, Energy, and Work

Paying for chores is definitely a way for a child to connect earning money with doing work, using time, and putting in energy.

Adjustments You Can Make to Your Chore/Kid Money System

If after reading this you’re unhappy with parts of your chore system, I want to offer you a few tweaks you can make:

  • Hybrid Approach: If you want to still pay for chores, but think it’s important to internalize the motivation and build natural goodwill in your child for pitching in, then you can introduce family duties. These are chores that each person in the family must do, without pay, just because they are part of the household. Let’s face it – when your child grows up, they’ll have to clean dishes and do laundry, and wipe down kitchen counters just because they have a household, not because they’re paid. So, this could be a great idea! You can frame this as “responsibilities” versus “chores”.
  • Use a Different Type of Kid Money System: I go through a free training called the Kid Money System Challenge. One of the takeaways from my research is that there are more systems for getting money into your child’s hands than paying through chores – so you can just choose a different system, and keep the chores as nonpayment.

In the end? It all comes down to what your gut is telling you. Remember, you can always try a system or an age appropriate chore for kids  out, give it a real whirl, and then ditch it or tweak a few parts to make it work for you and your family. Nothing is set in stone!

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Teaching Children About Money By Modeling Good Money Strategy

If you’re working on teaching children about money, then I want to show you why you need to be modeling good money strategy as part of your efforts, and 7 ways to do so (even if you’re faking it!).

Did you know that 69% of parents feel reluctant to discuss money matters with their kids?

What that tells me is that the majority of kids are learning money habits by modeling behavior from their parents.

Because they learn it from somewhere, right? What kind of money teaching activities are they observing?

And that’s not just a hunch; after interviewing 17 Mama Bears about their money desires for teaching children about money + their own money relationships, their answers confirmed as much.

Here are a few quotes about where they picked up their financial education (since they didn’t get an official one from their parents):

  • “…My mother's example of always saving and not spending like crazy.”
  • “…My mom had and still has credit card debt. You would think I would have learned to avoid the struggle but I didn't.”
  • “…My dad was an accountant so I more just watched than was taught.”
  • “…I grew up in a family where my parents struggled to make ends meet so I inherited a lot of the poverty mindset. I am aware of it and have to constantly remind myself that I am not my parents.”

In other words, Mama Bears – we’ve gotta be more diligent in the money behavior we’re modeling to our kids (not to mention work on the whole money-broaching-conversations. Check this fun resource out to help with that).

In fact, modeling good money habits for your kids means they’re more likely to have good money habits of their own  (unfortunately, the other side is true as well. Model bad money behaviors to your kids? And they’re more likely to follow suit. Just look at the stats).

It’s a little scary, right?

I’m here to show you 7 different money behaviors you can model as part of teaching children about money to ensure your child is getting the RIGHT idea about money – the kind that will help them to be diligent savers in the future.

Money Model #1: Set a Household Pay-Yourself-First Rule

Money Behavior Modeled: How to set up a healthy savings rule to follow.

Let them know that in your household, there is a pay-yourself-first rule that both parents AND kids play by.

Then share with them a percentage of your own money that automatically gets saved each month (hint: if you’re not currently saving a percentage of your income, now’s a good time to start).

Money Model #2: Set Up a Skim-Off-the-Top Rule

Money Behavior Modeled: Always, always, save money off the top of anything that comes in the door. Even if it’s from Grandma’s wallet.

Show your kids that each time any extra cash comes into your hands – from a bonus, a promotion, an inheritance, Mom still sending money to you for your birthday (thanks, Mom!) – you skim the same percentage from above off the top and put it into savings.

Money Model #3: Flip Your Household Money Language on its Head

Money Behavior Modeled: How to set your intention for what you want and expect, plus how to have faith in yourself, and your kids, despite past behavior.

“In this household, we save money as soon as we get it.”

Repeat this savings mantra to your kids.

Even if it’s not true. Even if they spend their money as soon as they get it (even if you do, too, Mama Bear – no judgment here).

By changing your expectations for them, you’ll help shape their actual behaviors.

Money Model #4: Pass Down a Savings Story

Money Behavior Modeled: How to come up with a savings goal, and see it through.

Events become legendary in families when they’re told through stories that get passed down over and over.

Add a savings story in your family’s legend. You, your spouse, or your parents get to detail a time when you really, really wanted to buy something and decided it was so important that you wanted to save for it.

Don’t gloss over the details, and don’t forget to include any mistakes made! Sometimes – after the fact – those can be funny and add elements to the story so that it can become legendary in your family tree.

Money Model #5: Let Your Kiddos Listen in On a Money Meeting

Money Behavior Modeled: Communication with your partner about finances is absolutely key in a healthy marriage.

Have a conversation ahead of time to outline a few things you’re both comfortable talking about with the kids listening.

Money Model #6: Choose a Family Savings Goal

Money Behavior Modeled: How to set a goal, and save up for it through to the end.

Maybe you’re not ready to sit down and whip out all your bills or financial statements to show your kiddo how it all works.

That’s perfectly fine.

Instead, hold a family meeting and choose a family savings goal – this is how you can let them in on the money world in a positive, but still realistic way without revealing too much of your own digits.

Money Model #7: Hold a Family Yard Sale with Proceeds Going Towards a Purpose

Money Behavior Modeled: How to give your money a purpose, and see it through despite how much comes in.

Involve the whole family in either a neighborhood yard sale, or one you set up and advertise for yourself.

Here's the “modeling good money strategy” catch: ahead of time, tell your kiddos where all of the money is going to go to. Then let them watch you send the money to that specific place.

Where could the proceeds go to? It could go to a charity, a personal savings goal, or see Money Move #6.

Of course, with any of these action steps above that you take you’ve got to remember one thing: kids are no dummies. They will see if you say one thing and do something completely different.

Don’t worry when teaching children about money – you don’t have to be perfect, either! There are golden nuggets in life’s imperfections. If you do slip up, be sure to talk to your kids about your mistakes and how you’re going to change them moving forward. That is a much better money education than just trying to sneak it under the rug while they’re not looking.

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Age Appropriate Chores for Kids

Ever wondered what OTHER moms' chore list for kids look like? I’ve gathered the inside scoop from over 170 mothers to show you age appropriate chores for kids.

Declaring age appropriate chores and amount of responsibility that will work for every single kid is, well, kinda hard.

I mean, YOU’RE not even sure what your kid is capable of doing, or what would be ‘appropriate’, or ‘developmentally right’ to ask them to do, right? What are some chores for kids by age anyways?  That’s why you’re here.

So, for someone else to say that THEY know what your kid is capable of or is not capable of is kind of silly.

But, I’m a mom too. We like some guidance to go along with our gut intuition, right?

It’s nice to get some guidance on what other kids in your child’s age range are capable of doing so that you can make the right choices for your family.

With that in mind, I’ve set out to do just that – not to write out a long list of age appropriate chores for kids based on what I think is right for your child, but to actually put in the market research to figure out what the other moms are doing with their kids when it comes to helping out around the household.

I’ve sifted through over 179 responses from mothers and fathers of kids aged 2-19 about the child appropriate chores in their household. I’ve charted all the responses out, and come up with an age appropriate chores list based on what mothers are actually doing.

Not based on what “gurus” say.

Not based on what best-selling authors say.

This comes directly from YOU.

And before I release them, I’d like to go over two thoughts to keep in mind as you’re picking and choosing your own chores + household tasks you’ll be introducing into your family.

Choose Household Chores that Will Enable Your Child to Grow

When thinking about assigning age appropriate chores for kids, I want you to pick chores from a list of chores that can fill three different buckets:

  1. Chores they’ve Mastered: Pick a few chores they’re already really good at, and can teach their younger siblings (if they have any).
  2. Chores they’re Working On: Pick a few chores they can do on their own, but that they haven’t mastered yet (creating Chore step-by-step expectation cards for these is a good idea).
  3. Chores You Help Them With: Pick a few chores that are beyond their reach, but that they can help you with to start understanding how the process works. Remember that one of the ways kids learn best is by you modeling behaviors and strategies to them!

If you fill all three of these buckets, then your kid will constantly be growing, even from just doing chores around the home! They’ll be both instructor (teaching someone else your knowledge takes practice, but is a hugely important life skill), they’ll learn how to master something + patience with seeing incremental improvements, and they’ll learn how to take on a challenge/ask for help when something is too difficult with them.

I don’t know about you, but those are lessons I definitely want my own son to learn.

That, and, one more thing: money lessons.

And I’m not talking about whether or not to pay your child for chores (another subject for another day).

I’m talking about adding in money chores to the list of chores you expect your children to do so that it normalizes money management and teaches them some important money lessons.

Psst: need help creating a family chores system? Read on. Then, you might want to check out should kids get paid to do chores.

Don’t Forget about Adding Money Chores to Your List

And don’t forget about money chores! Money management takes time and energy, and kids can definitely be involved in household money management – don’t worry, this doesn’t mean they’ll have to know your salary or other personal information you’d rather not share.

Choose from the money chores list below, listed from easiest to hardest:

  • Loose-Change Locator: Give your youngin’ a job of looking under couch cushions, in the nether regions of your car, and on top of the dryer for loose change that needs to find it’s way to the family piggy bank.
  • Roll Up Family Change Jar: You can get free coin rolls from your bank. Rotate which kid gets to do this money chore every few months!
  • Family Banking Day: Choose one day a week where everyone gets to update their banking needs by physically going to the bank or an atm to make deposits, transfers, etc. If your child doesn’t have a savings account yet, now’s a great time to get them one! Bonus: since your kids know that a family banking day is scheduled into each week, every other week, or each month, then they’ll start to learn to plan some of their money handling needs out ahead of time.
  • Store Receipts Manager: How fun would it be for your child to scan in store receipts, once a week, and actually earn money doing so? Use the CoinOut app for this. The money could go towards a family purchase, your family savings goal, or to them for doing the work (a chore you actually don’t have to pay for!).
  • Gas Price Finder: Have a kid with a smart phone? Put them to work with the task of finding the cheapest gas price for your family each week. You can use a free online tool like GasBuddy to do this.

What other money chores can you think of?

What Makes a Chore Age Appropriate?

Before we dive into the actual results, I just wanted to give a little guidance on what would make the following chores list age appropriate for your child.

Here’s some criteria to think about:

  1. Is Not Dangerous for their Age/Capability Level: Would your child have to stand up high, or use chemicals to complete the chore (you can always have them wear cleaning gloves, or switch out to natural cleaners – in our household, for example, we use a homemade vinegar-water solution to wipe down lots of places)? Is it in an area of the house where you normally need to supervise them (like around the stove top)?
  2. Your Gut Says It’s Time: I’m a strong believer in listening to my gut, even more so now that I’m a mother. And you know what? My gut has never steered me wrong in parenting my child. Does your gut say that the chore you’re thinking about is age appropriate for your kiddo, or not yet?

Also, in general, you want to get really specific with tasks when they’re younger – such as, “pick up the toys on that rug and put them away in this box.” As they age, you can broaden your chore requests more to things like, “clean up your room”. This is because as they age they’ll know better what the broader chore expectations are from both chore experiences over the years plus their own natural brain development.

Pssst: wondering how do you get kids to do their chores? I've got a really cool, free chore game — the White Elephant Family Chores Game. You definitely want to check that out!

Chores List by Age – Kids Jobs Chores

Alright. Are you looking for a kid's list of chores to do around the house? Now the time has come to release the list of age appropriate chores for kids, per the responses of 179 mothers.

I’ll break it down by actual age, and you can click around as needed.

Note: in the end, YOU know your child’s maturity level, capabilities, skills, talents, etc. Below is what lots of other mothers are doing to give you ideas, but be sure to choose based on both where your child is now, and where you’d like them to get to.

Chores for 2-Year-Olds

Personal Responsibilities

  • Clean up/pick up toys
  • Put shoes on
  • Make bed
  • Take shoes off and put away
  • Throw diaper away
  • Clean up a mess such as throwing food or juice in the floor
  • Tidy room
  • Put dirty clothes in hamper

Kitchen

  • Put dishes in dishwasher
  • Help unload dishwasher
  • Take dishes to kitchen sink
  • Set table
  • Help put away groceries

Laundry

  • Help change over wash to dryer

General Cleaning

  • Sweep behind (after) the parents

Chores for 3-Year-Olds

Personal Responsibilities

  • Clean room
  • Pick up toys
  • Pick up messes
  • Pick up toy room
  • Make bed
  • Put dirty clothes in hamper
  • Help fold laundry

Kitchen

  • Clean off dining room table
  • Help put silverware away
  • Puts dishes in the sink
  • Set table
  • Help empty dishwasher

Laundry

  • Load washer
  • Help put clothes away
  • Hand him clothes from washer to put in dryer
  • Press button to start dryer
  • Help fold laundry

Pets

  • Feed animals
  • Feed dogs

Yard Work

  • Take care of garden

General Cleaning

  • Take out little bags of trash from bathrooms
  • Help dust
  • Help sweep

Chores for 4-Year-Olds

Personal Responsibilities

  • Make bed
  • Clean their room
  • Put dirty clothes into hamper
  • Pick up toys
  • Clean up playroom
  • Clean up after themselves
  • Hang up backpack
  • Put away shoes
  • Put lunchbox in kitchen

Kitchen

  • Put dishes in sink
  • Dishes/rinses dishes
  • Start the dishwasher
  • Empty dishwasher
  • Setting/clearing their spot at dinner table
  • Wipe down the table
  • Help put away groceries

Pets

  • Pets/feed their dog/feed cat/feed and water chickens
  • Help clean chicken house

Laundry

  • Laundry/help do laundry
  • Hang clothes

Yard Work

  • Take care of garden
  • Water their plant

General Cleaning

  • Hand vacuums furniture
  • Dust the house
  • Pick up trash around house
  • Empty small trash cans
  • Sweep
  • Help when asked with anything
  • Throw out his trash

Chores for 5-Year-Olds – Appropriate Chores for a 5 Year Old

Personal Responsibilities

  • Pick up toys
  • Make bed
  • Clean personal room

Kitchen

  • Make meals
  • Set table
  • Clear plate at dinner
  • Wipe off table after meals
  • Dishes

Laundry

  • Learning to wash/dry/fold/hang laundry
  • Bring dirty clothes to laundry room

Pets

  • Feed/water chickens
  • Help clean chicken house
  • Feeds/waters animal

Yard Work/ Outside

  • Take garbage/recycling cans in from curb
  • Weed
  • Help wash car
  • Get mail (with supervision)
  • Rake

General Cleaning

  • Cleans mirrors/windows (with vinegar)
  • Pick up trash around house
  • Take out bathroom trash
  • Help clean up toys in living room at night
  • Help dust
  • Help vacuum
  • Help clean the house (bathrooms, etc.)

Chores for 6-Year-Olds

Personal Responsibilities

  • Clean room
  • Clean up playroom
  • Clean up after themselves
  • Fold personal laundry
  • Put clothes in hamper

Kitchen

  • Get their own snacks
  • Get ingredients from basement pantry for parent while cooking
  • Help make meals
  • Take dishes to the sink
  • Dishes
  • Put away dishes
  • Load/unload dishwasher
  • Set/clear table
  • Wipe off table

Laundry

  • Separate laundry
  • Load laundry into washer
  • Move laundry over to dryer
  • Put laundry away

Pets

  • Feed/water chickens
  • Help clean chicken house
  • Give the dog treats

Yard Work/Outside

  • Water flowers
  • Weed
  • Get mail

General Cleaning

  • Gather house trash
  • Help take trash out
  • Mop floors
  • Vacuum
  • Sweep the tile
  • Gather house trash
  • Dust
  • Wipe windows/mirrors
  • Clean bathroom
  • Use clean wipes to clean surfaces
  • Clean bathroom floor
  • Clean all doors in house
  • Weed
  • Help when asked with anything

Chores for 7-Year-Olds

Personal Responsibilities

  • Clean room
  • Pick up after himself/herself
  • Keep room tidy (clear bedroom floor, make bed, put shoes away, etc.)

Kitchen

  • Bring in groceries
  • Clear the table
  • Unpack lunchbox and school bag
  • Set table
  • Unload dishwasher/put away clean silverware
  • Dishes
  • Wipe down cabinets

Laundry

  • Match socks
  • Put laundry in hamper
  • Put away their clothes + little sibling's clothes

Pets

  • Gather eggs from chickens
  • Feed/water dog
  • Put dog outside

Yard work/Outside

  • Weed garden/gardening help
  • Clean out car

General Cleaning

  • Clean living room
  • Sweep floors
  • Dust
  • Mop
  • Take out trash
  • Help with garbage
  • Clean the baseboards
  • Help cleanup messes
  • Use clean wipes to clean bathrooms
  • Tidy bathrooms
  • Clean hallway
  • Clean living areas
  • Anything else I ask help with

Siblings

  • Help younger siblings as required

Chores for 8-Year-Olds

Personal Responsibilities

  • Puts away personal laundry
  • Make bed
  • Clean room
  • Ensure own clothes are in hamper and that they are not all rolled up into a ball

Kitchen

  • Cooks one night/week
  • Assist with cooking preparation
  • Set the table
  • Sweep/mop (swiffer) kitchen and dining room
  • Load/unload dishwasher
  • Wipe down kitchen table
  • Put away dishes
  • Hand-wash dishes once/week

Laundry

  • Fold towels
  • Switch laundry loads
  • Wash laundry

Pets

  • Collects eggs in morning
  • Coop scooping
  • Take care of pets/Clean the cat litter box/feed cat

Yard/Outside

  • Clean out car
  • Pick up any trash
  • Trash/recycle duty
  • Clean yard/weed/help in yard when we do yard work
  • Light gardening
  • Take trash out/bring in big garbage can from street

General Cleaning

  • Vacuum downstairs
  • Wipe down all counters and kitchen table
  • Clean mirrors
  • Wipe down bathroom sinks
  • Sweep/mop
  • Sweep room
  • Clean their bathroom counter/toilet
  • Clean all doors in house
  • Put the trash bag in the can
  • Help when asked for anything
  • Pick up toys
  • Dust

Chores for 9-Year-Olds

Personal Responsibilities

  • Clean room
  • Pick up after himself/herself
  • Puts laundry away
  • Put laundry in hamper
  • Brush teeth

Kitchen

  • Dishes
  • Clear plates from dinner
  • Unload/load dishwasher
  • Bring in groceries
  • Wipe down kitchen counters
  • Sweep floors

Laundry

  • Put clothes away
  • Sort/wash/dry all laundry
  • Get dirty clothes to laundry room

Pets

  • Gather eggs from chickens
  • Feed/water dog
  • Put dog outside
  • Clean litter box daily
  • Clean bird cage
  • Change water for pet
  • Give dog a bath

Yard/Outside

  • Garbage
  • Take trash out to curb
  • Pick sticks and pine cones out of yard to prep for mowing
  • Clean out car

General Cleaning

  • Clean bathroom
  • Dust
  • Pick up dog poop
  • Sweep floors
  • Mop
  • Vacuum
  • Clean personal bathroom
  • Empty trash
  • Cleans sink/mirrors in bathroom
  • Clean up when asked

Sibling Support

  • Oversight for sibling's chores

What are Some Good Chores for a 10-Year-Old?

Personal Responsibilities

  • Clean their room

Kitchen

  • One weekend morning/month cooks breakfast
  • Mop
  • Dishwasher
  • Dishes
  • Wipe tables
  • Putting utensils away

Laundry

  • Sort dirty laundry
  • Put away personal laundry

Pets

  • Feed pets
  • Take care of pet

Yard/Outside

  • Take garbage out
  • Water flowers
  • Mow lawn
  • Cleans out car/wash car
  • Pull weeds

General Cleaning

  • VacuumDust
  • Clean family room
  • Sweep
  • Gather trash
  • Clean bathroom
  • Clean bathroom toilet
  • Clean mirrors/windows/glass door
  • Helps with household projects

Chores for 11-Year-Olds

Personal Responsibilities

  • Clean room

Kitchen

  • Help bring in groceries or other bags from car to kitchen
  • Clean kitchen after dinner
  • Take lunchbox to kitchen counter
  • Dishes
  • Empty dishwasher
  • Wipe down kitchen

Laundry

  • Fold laundry
  • Personal laundry
  • Put laundry away in closet

Pets

  • Help with pets
  • Clean out litter box daily
  • Feed and water pets

Yard/Outside

  • Pick up trash outside
  • Garbage/recycling
  • Take garbage out to the curb
  • Clean the deck

General Cleaning

  • Maintain dining room area free from food
  • Collect trash around house
  • Vacuum/vacuum upstairs
  • Sweep
  • Clean bathroom
  • Mop

Sibling Support

  • Help with babies
  • Clean kid's bathroom on rotation
  • Maintain the house clean/free from toys
  • Clean up little sister's messes

Chores for 12-Year-Olds

Personal Responsibilities

  • Personal laundry
  • Clean personal room

Kitchen

  • Set/clear table
  • Load/unload dishwasher

Laundry

  • Hang and put away shirts/clothes
  • Fold/put away towels

Pets

  • Bath/walk/feed dogs/feed pet
  • Pick up dog poop

Yard/Outside

  • Cut grass
  • Trash/take out trash
  • Get mail

General Cleaning

  • Clean bathroom/clean their bathroom
  • Clean the living room
  • Dust
  • Sweep floors

Chores for Teenagers

Chores for 13-Year-Olds

Personal Responsibilities

  • Personal laundry
  • Clean their room

Kitchen

  • Clean kitchen
  • Load/unload dishes daily
  • Dishes

Pets

  • Water chickens
  • Pick up dog poop/take care of dogs
  • Water dogs
  • Feed cats
  • Clean litter box

Yard/Outside

  • Pick up trash outside/clean yard
  • Trash out to curb/back
  • Garbage/recycling
  • Clean the deck
  • Mow lawn

General Cleaning

  • Clean bathroom
  • Mop
  • Vacuum
  • Dust
  • Sweep
  • Bathroom rotation
  • Clean mirrors

Chore Ideas for 14-Year-Olds

Kitchen

  • Make dinner
  • Some cooking
  • Dishes
  • Empty dishwasher

Yard/Outside

  • Outdoor chores
  • Cut grass
  • Walk the dog

General Cleaning

  • Vacuum
  • Laundry
  • Help set up/break down at shows for your business
  • Sweep/mop floors
  • Clean bathroom
  • Dust

Chores for 15-Year-Olds

  • Clean bathroom
  • Taking out grandmother's garbage

Chores for 16-Year-Olds

Personal Responsibilities

  • Organize shoes

Kitchen

  • Load/unload dishwasher
  • Vaccuum under table
  • clear table/set table
  • help cook

Yard/Outside

  • Garbage

What are age appropriate chores for kids that are my kid’s ages? I have a 5, 8, and 10 year old – what am I supposed to give them for chores? I love how this woman actually surveyed 170 mothers to find out what THEY are doing with their kids, then breaks it down in lists, by age. Children chores list, including HOW you should go about choosing chores for your own child (growth mentality in mind – love that!). Teen chores included. #choresforkids #chores

Any Good Habits For Kids List Needs To Include These Money Habits

Any good habits for kids list needs to include good money habits as well. Let me show you which habits to nurture to make it more likely your child will successfully manage their money as an adult.

“You didn’t brush your teeth today.”

“Feed the dog – an animal needs to be taken care of.”

“You have to finish your homework before you get 20 minutes on your phone.”

As parents, we seek out our chores for kids by age. We ask or tell our children to do things every day that not only benefit them currently – such as getting rid of bad breath, or making sure poor Fido doesn’t go to bed hungry – but that also instill a lifelong habit in them.

A healthy habit. Good habits for kids.

I’ve said it before, but it’s worth repeating many times over: as parents, we cannot know how our kids will turn out.

Trust me: as a recovering-Type-A-personality, it pains me to type that out.

But one thing that we CAN do is to give them the resources, experiences, and to model good behavior for them in the hopes that they use it and grow into ‘successful’ adults.

Wellll…that and ONE other thing.

What if I told you that there’s one thing you can do right now with your child that will ensure some future successes handling their money as an adult?

Now THAT’S exciting.

Here’s the One Thing: planting healthy money habits into their brains so that they’ll be more likely to do them on autopilot in the future.

How to Instill a Good Habit in Your Child

Have you ever heard the phrase, “humans are creatures of habit?”

I’ve got my own habits to attest to this – and I’m sure you do, too.

Like when I lock the back door each time I come in or go out. Or when I check my email first thing when I wake up (probably on the “bad” habit side!). Or how I have to add money to our retirement savings each month before I can think about funding our travel account.

We want to send your child off into the wilds of the real world with good money habits already hardwired into them.

But how is any habit hardwired into a child?

One of the ways is to get your child started on The Habit Loop. Research from author Charles Duhigg shows that a habit is actually a loop in your brain. The three components of that loop are:

  • The Cue: This is the thing that triggers a person to behave in a certain way. It’s very specific. For example, when my 2-year-old naps, my brain cues *seek decompression*.
  • The Routine: This is what you do when you’re triggered – the behavior itself. From my example above, my routine (and one I’m keen to change) is to turn on the tv and catch an episode of a DVR’d series.
  • The Reward: This is the reward that the person gets from behaving in that way. In the example, my reward for doing this is that I don’t have to think for about 45 minutes – my brain gets a break.

Duhigg summarizes it nicely:

“Put another way, a habit is a formula our brain automatically follows: When I see CUE, I will do ROUTINE in order to get a REWARD.”

We’re going to use this to our advantage so that we can instill some excellent money habits into your child.

How to Get Your Child Started with Money Habits

You’re excited about this, right?

Your child’s initial cue for doing any of the money chores we’ll discuss below is you telling them to. You establish it as a routine chore in your household – just like putting their plates in the dishwasher, or scrubbing their bathroom counter –and you establish that there’s an expectation that chores are done.

But gradually, your child will internalize this cue. It’ll become a natural part of their routine because they’re consistently carrying it out. Pretty soon – it’ll feel weird for them NOT to do it. Sort of like when you have the kids home all summer and then it feels weird when they go back to school and are not around.

And the reward? Well, it might be an external reward to begin with (depending on whether or not you reward them in some way for chores). But eventually, they’ll internalize the rewards as well.

Hint: You can quicken that process of making them intrinsically motivated to do these money chores by tying the money chores to their personal money goals.

Picking the Money Habits to Give Your Child

The way you want to introduce these money habits is by introducing money chores on top of your child’s normal set of chores.

You want to show your child that these are repetitive money tasks they need to do – and that YOU do – to be successful.

Psssst: you don’t have money chores/tasks/habits that you’re proud of? Now’s the perfect time to jump into this with your child. Your finances will completely change from doing this!

So, how do you pick the money habits to give your child?

The first place to start is to ask yourself some questions.

  • What money habits are serving you well right now?
  • Which of your money habits did you have to learn “the hard-knocks way”, and you’d rather your child start the habit at an early age?

3 Great Money Habits to Instill in Your Child

I’m not going to leave you hanging – that’s not my style.

Aside from the money habits you’ve decided you want to hardwire into your child’s brain, I’ve got 3 great money habits that would be awesome for your child.

Money Habit #1: Check Your Numbers

Where you put your attention, grows. Aside from that, you don’t want to miss fraudulent transactions, underestimate the amount you’ve spent, or lose track of where you’re at.

So, you want your child to consistently check their numbers. Likely, they don’t have a bunch of money numbers to check yet. But here are a few they might:

  • Checking account balance
  • Piggy account balance (be careful with this one; it’s best to tie it in with a money savings goal so that they aren’t tempted to spend their piggy bank balances out of excitement once they become aware of how much they have!)
  • Leftover allowance money (they can shuffle this to their savings goal once they become aware of it)

Money Chore Frequency: Weekly.

Money Habit #2: Manage Your Receipts

It’s always a good idea to check up on how much money you’ve spent and to make sure there are no fraudulent purchases occurring on your accounts.

Not to mention, there are ways to get rewarded for your receipts. For example, your child can earn money using the CoinOut app by scanning in all their receipts (and yours, too, if you’ll let them!).

Here’s what the CoinOut app people have to say about kids using it:

“Kids can use the app as you only need to enter a phone number to sign up. They will have to have receipts to scan, but they can cash out to a gift card so they wouldn't need a bank account to redeem cash earned on the app.”

Encourage your child to keep all their receipts in a shoebox or other location. Then, once a week, have them add up how much they spent, scan them into a receipts app if you’re into that, and make sure their account reflects these purchases and no others.

Money Chore Frequency: Weekly.

Money Habit #3: Check in with Money Goals

Does your child have a money goal they’re saving up for? Like a bike, a video game, Pokémon cards, or they might even be saving up for an iPhone?

They need to consistently check in with their money goals. By doing so, they’ll be more likely to actually meet them. Plus, if they are disappointed with the progress they’ve made, then it’s an excellent time to talk with them about where they could improve to get back on track to getting what they want.

Money Chore Frequency:  Weekly to bi-weekly.

These are some really good habits for kids to not only master, but to have hardwired into their brain – the kind that will make a real difference to their bottom line, and life satisfaction in the years and decades to come.

I've been trying to figure out good habits for kids mine should learn so they don't make my mistakes. I had no idea a chores list should include money chores as well! So glad I found this age appropriate chore list for kids that includes money chores so that I know they're creating solid money habits! #goodhabitsforkids #choresforkidsbyage #ageappropriatechoresforkids #kidsandmoney #choressystemsforkids #chores #chorecharts #kids #teens #kidsearnmoney #chorelists | https://www.moneyprodigy.com/good-habits-for-kids/