These 19 free financial literacy games for high school students add engagement and FUN to teaching personal finance.

How do you make financial literacy fun?

One way is to assign one of these free financial literacy games for high school students from below.

These games will teach your students lots of really important financial lessons, such as:

  • How loans work and how loan sharks take advantage of people
  • How choices made right now and during college can greatly affect their future finances
  • How the stock market works
  • How much they’ll need to earn from a job in order to live their dream life
  • And much more…

Let’s get on with it!

Free Financial Literacy Games for High School Students

1. ShadySam

Your students get to play “loan shark” – predatory loan lender and collector – in order to learn all about risky loans and loans in general (like interest rates, what a loan is, loan collections, etc.).

It’s an eye-opening way to show your students how lenders can and do take advantage of people who take out loans. Hopefully one day, this can save them from the payday loan cycle!

screenshot of ShadySam Credit card game for high school students

2. Gen i Revolution

Do you want to work on a financial literacy game where students in your class get to compete against each other?

Gen i Revolution is a class-wide, free financial literacy game that gives a student a financial mission to complete. Each of the 16 missions take about 30 minutes to complete.

For example, a mission might be to convince someone that they should open and invest in their 401(k) for long-term wealth creation. Another mission is to help someone figure out how they’ll save $300 each month in order to save up for a down payment.

Also, there are free PDF lesson plans for you to go over with your class, if you’d like.

3. The Uber Game

Can a person survive on a job in the “gig economy”? That’s what this game attempts to reveal to your students.

They’ll be given an urgent financial need (such as – your mortgage of $1,000 is due in a week), and then will need to accept gig jobs from Uber in order to try and save up enough to pay their bills.

Can they do it?

screenshot of The Uber Game for high school students

4. Claim Your Future

Students are given a career with an annual salary, and then are asked to make certain budget and lifestyle choices based off of that salary.

Will they be able to afford the house they want, or have to rent with an apartment they share? Is their career choice enough to sustain their organic food tastes, or are they better off eating “basic” food?

screenshot of claim your future personal finance literacy game for teens

5. Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Games for Students

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has a whole section on lesson plans for teen financial literacy games – all are free to use.

Examples include:

  • Investigating investing
  • Handling a lost or stolen credit/debit card
  • Playing a credit and debit game

Online Budget Simulations for High School Students

You can really help to bring a budget alive when you have students go through a budget simulation – meaning, they take a budget that they’ve either made, or was given to them, and they attempt to see if they can “make it” without overspending.

Here’s a few online budget simulations to help high school students test out a budget.

1. Reality Check

JumpStart’s Reality Check is an eye-opening way to show your students how their wants can dramatically affect the amount of money they’ll need to earn in a career.

They take a student through 1 of X questions, asking them things like what type of housing they want, and what type of car they want.

Then, in the end, they spit out how much the teen will need to earn in order to afford that type of lifestyle.

Really can make a child think about their choices!

screenshot of reality check's budgeting game for kids

2. Money Magic

Students will help Enzo, a magician, save up $50,000 so that he can go to Las Vegas and have a venue to perform.

They’ll be asked to figure out how to spend Enzo’s money to get to his savings goal, with the spending categories being:

  • Advertising
  • Vegas Fund
  • Enzo’s Needs
  • Magic Shop Fund
  • Maintenance
screenshot of free personal finance literacy game for high school students called Money Magic

3. Spent

Sometimes I hear from parents that they have no idea how to teach their kids about poverty and homelessness.

This is a wonderful simulation if you’d like to make your students more aware of how difficult it can be to live on a low income. It also can build some empathy to the problem, as teens start to understand how it is someone might end up on the corner of a street, asking for money.

Students are told they are unemployed, have lost their house, and are down to their last $1,000. They must make it to the end of the month with that $1,000.

Can they do it?  

screenshot of online budgeting game for students Spent

Pssst: you’ll definitely want to check out my article on budgeting scenarios for high school students – chocked full of free resources.

4. Hit the Road Financial Adventure

You are going to take a cross-country road trip with your friends, and need to keep within a budget (without going hungry, stalling your car because you forgot to buy gas, and actually making it to your destination).

Can your students stay within budget and keep enough money to make it all the way to their destination?

Financial Simulation Games Personal Finance Games Simulations

Financial simulations games are different from what we’ve discussed above, as they attempt to make financial situations more “real” with students and engage them in decision-making that has actual consequences to their results.

1. Stock Market Games

If your students are learning about investing, then a free online stock market game could be just the thing to help them understand it better.

Kids sign up either in groups, as a class, or as individuals, and everyone is given a certain amount of money to invest at the beginning. Then, students follow along with the real market to see how their decisions are stacking up.

Some competitions even have reward money and prizes that they give out!

Free online stock market games for kids include:

2. Finance 101

This is a decision-based, online financial simulation game with changing scenarios depending on what your students choose.

Your student is given a random profession, one of the 13 stops they’ll make that will greatly impact their decisions, finances, and game play.

For example, I went through the game and was given the profession of Accountant. My salary was broken down for me, and then I was shown how much I’ll pay in taxes. Then, I was asked which type of checking and savings account I would like to open, and how much money I want to save from my paycheck.

screenshot of Finance 101 personal finance literacy game for kids

3. Payback

Paying back student loans has proved to be too much for some students, especially if they fail to find a job on a career path.

This financial simulation game can help your teen students better pick out careers and majors based on simulating what kinds of jobs they might find when they graduate, and how much their student loans might be.

They’ll be asked to make critical decisions that will have a direct effect on their budgets and finances post-college, such as what type of college they want to attend (i.e., 4-year, 2-year, community, in-state, out-of-state).

Also, they’ll decide on more immediate needs, such as whether or not to buy a new laptop for college, or if they should take a low-paying, labor job to help pay the bills.

screenshot of Payback free financial literacy game for students

Financial Literacy Board Games for Teens

Let’s not forget about good, old-fashioned board games that can help teens and high school students understand finances better.

1. Act Your Wage! Board Game

Suggested Age Range: 10 years+
Players: 2-4 players

Everyone starts off in debt in this game. Then, each player is given a life persona that will determine what kind of salary and how much debt they have.

Players choose a “Life” card, and three “Debt” cards to begin the game.

For my round, I was given the following:

  • $6,000 in student loan debt
  • $6,000 in student loan debt
  • $5,000 in business loan debt

Yikes! That's $17,000 in debt to start, which feels slightly overwhelming.

Good thing it's just a game, but one that will show your students how destabilizing debt can be (and also, how to work through it). Kids are also given a salary, and $1,000 in an emergency fund to start.

Free financial literacy games for high school students and kids can really add fun and self-discovery to financial literacy teachings. Tell me below which one your own kids are trying and learning from!

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Amanda L. Grossman is a Certified Financial Education Instructor, a 2016 Plutus Foundation Grant Recipient, and founder of Money Prodigy. Amanda's kid money work has been featured on Experian, GoBankingRates, PT Money, CA.gov, Rockstar Finance, the Houston Chronicle, and Colonial Life. Read more here.